Creating Responsive Web Designs

When designing websites, we keep in mind the specifications required for mobile phones, tablets, laptops but we totally forget about the giant-sized desktop screens. Even though we like to think these giant-sized desktops have become obsolete, such is not the case.

There still exists many such people who rely on the bigger screens for website viewing but face problems for the not-so-developed responsive web design versions for desktops. Some of the issues are highlighted below:

Background images designed for smaller screens tend to leave extra space
Font size becomes tiny and can’t be read easily.
The body text columns are too wide making it tough to read.
Full-screen background problem
These and many other problems arise because developers and designers overlook the need for bigger resolution responsive web designing or perhaps concentrate more on designing websites to fit the smaller screens.

Background-image problem

The only solution for background-image problems to use a big full-screen image preferably pixelate or having no focal point along with a stylish font overlay and large sized radio buttons. But the problem is image distortion. Desktop screens come in varying resolutions ranging from 800*600 to 2560*1440 and even bigger. So while one keeps increasing image size, it may look appealing up to a specific resolution, but when it starts becoming pixelate and loses focal points, it’s advisable to adopt a better solution. So instead of increasing image size, why not utilize the extra space in some innovative way and enhance user experience on desktops?

Optimal readability experience

For optimum reading, the usual number of characters added per line can be from 65 to 75. Anything wider than that becomes difficult to read. One idea is to use centrally divided responsive web design layouts and column layouts. With the help of this, developers succeed in creating designs that keep the users glued to the site hungry to read more.

Centrally divided responsive web design layouts

A responsive web design layout having web pages vertically divided into two halves can solve the problem of extra space. Both the halves have different content in different color making the page interesting and intriguing. The design also helps users to identify their area of interest and sometimes the two halves can be scrolled independently or one maybe fixed and the other scrollable. It successfully utilizes the extra space in best way possible, adding more information and enhancing user experience on large desktops.

Conclusion

Developers must pay equal attention in creating responsive web designs for both mobile phones and larger desktops because even if it might seem that the whole world is using mobiles, it isn’t true.The role of designers and developers is to create unique responsive web design layouts that can give users impressive experiences irrespective of their choice of screen resolution.